Nest: more than a thermostat

Nest has several new products in development that together could help form a smart home security system, according to a report last week from The Information. The four products reportedly in Nest’s pipeline are:

Flintstone: a wireless gateway device that will connect all of the devices in a user’s home using Nest’s Thread wireless networking protocol. The device would also wirelessly connect those devices to the home Wi-Fi router and translate commands sent between the Thread and Wi-Fi networks. The thread networking protocol uses less battery power than Wi-Fi, making it a better option for connecting small, low-power devices like sensors and smart locks.
Pinna: a set of security sensors that send alerts to the Flintstone hub whenever a homeowner’s doors or windows are opened.
Keshi: a Thread-connected sensor that could be used for a variety of purposes. For instance, the sensor could be placed in a key fob and used to unlock a smart lock when the user gets home.
Voice-recognition device: Google is working on its own voice-recognition device that will compete with Amazon’s Echo, and Nest is part of the project, according to The Information. Google already has its own voice-recognition technology that is installed in the Android mobile operating system. The device Google is working on would bring that technology into the home and allow users to control their smart home devices by voice command.
Nest isn’t the only company that has struggled to make successful smart home products. There are many major barriers in the market that providers have yet to address including the high cost of smart home devices, the vulnerability of these devices to hackers, and the lack of standards that would allow different devices from different manufacturers to communicate with each other. Despite these overarching issues, improved home security is one of the biggest benefits that consumers want from their smart home devices. So Nest’s potential move into the home security market would be a logical one

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