Wireless: the next generation #iot

The advent of 5G is likely to bring another splurge of investment, just as orders for 4G equipment are peaking. The goal is to be able to offer users no less than the “perception of infinite capacity”, says Rahim Tafazolli, director of the 5G Innovation Centre at the University of Surrey. Rare will be the device that is not wirelessly connected, from self-driving cars and drones to the sensors, industrial machines and household appliances that together constitute the “internet of things” (IoT).

Great insight on Economist.

http://www.economist.com/news/business/21693197-new-wave-mobile-technology-its-way-and-will-bring-drastic-change-wireless-next?fsrc=scn/fb/te/pe/ed/wirelessthenextgeneration

I don’t care if you are annoyed by my posts: I am posting for me #ragnarrelay

 

Setting Goals & Accountability

Some of you may have seen me posting across my social status’ attributed to my health and physical accomplishments. If the posts annoy you, delete me. It’s fine, seriously. I am cool with it. What I am doing is for me and not for you, but I accept that losing you as a connection may be the consequence of taking care of myself.

I am training to accomplish a personal goal of completing my 4th Ragnar Relay. This race will take me and my team 200 miles south, from Huntington Beach to San Diego over a 36 hours period.

Here is the catch- I am not a runner. In fact, just 4 years ago before I trained for my first Ragnar I was very much overweight and had been nearly all my life.

 

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Much larger me

I was tired all the time.

I was unhappy with how I felt and my digestive system was a mess.

I had no concept of the idea that one actually eats for “fuel” not to “fill”.

Training for Ragnar changed my life.

I found that by setting a goal (to compete) and knowing that 11 other members of my team were counting on me to complete each leg of the race in a respectable time sparked something  in me that I didn’t really know was dormant; my desire to overcome. Being an entrepreneur, competitiveness and team building is part of my daily life. What I didn’t realize about myself was that  by setting goals and sharing them with others would create a support system and help to keep me accountable. In the case of working out, sharing what I am doing to train also helps others to see that I take myself (my health, family time and me time) serious; something that I have found to be critical to success in business interestingly enough as it provides the opportunity to find perspective.

My runs have become my time. My runs have become my time to let things go that have been bothering me. My runs have become the time I use to think about all aspects of my life (Family, Business, Future, Fiscal) allowing me to be more efficient in the rest of my day.

I am not a runner but running has changed my life.

I know that every hour I spend on me in this manner is one more hour I will be on this earth spending time with my family- and that is the best investment I can make bar none.

 

As such, I post my accomplishments because it helps me to be accountable and to ensure that I keep on track to achieve my goal of kicking Ragnar’s ass (again).

To those of you who like or comment on my runs I say THANK YOU. Your encouragement helps me to be accountable to myself and I appreciate it.

Special thanks to Joe Carrier and Matt Gray for introducing me to my new self. Shout out to April for the amazing meals at 7pm that keep me fueled not just filled http://homeby7.wordpress.com 

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When the World Is Wired: The Magic of the Internet of Everything – Singularity HUB

http://singularityhub.com/2016/02/09/when-the-world-is-wired-the-magic-of-the-internet-of-everything/#%2EVrpyn88UTbE%2Elinkedin

Unexpected convergent consequences: This is what happens when eight different exponential technologies all explode onto the scene at once.

An expert might be reasonably good at predicting the growth of a single exponential technology (e.g., the Internet of Things), but try to predict the future when the following eight technologies are all doubling, morphing and recombining. You have a very exciting (read: unpredictable) future.

1. Computation

2. Internet of Things (Sensors & Networks)

3. Robotics/Drones

4. Artificial Intelligence

5. 3D Printing

6. Materials Science

7. Virtual/Augmented Reality

8. Synthetic Biology

The enterprise is growing faster than consumer:IOT

HIGH PRICES MEAN THE SMART HOME MARKET WILL DRAG ON CONSUMER IoT ADOPTION: Lack of consumer demand will inhibit IoT adoption, as many consumers are turned off by the high prices of many consumer IoT products, a recent Motley Fool article predicts. The article questioned the reliability of forecasts predicting billions of IoT devices will be deployed over the next few years, citing a consumer survey by Accenture in which 62% of respondents called IoT devices too expensive. The Motley Fool article points out that enterprises will be faster than consumers to adopt IoT devices, as  the data extracted from these devices will be extremely valuable for them.

BI Intelligence agrees with the assessment that enterprises will adopt IoT devices faster than consumers. We predict that 24 billion IoT devices will be connected by 2020, with enterprise IoT devices making up the biggest share of that installed base, followed by the government and then consumer sectors. The consumer sector will make up only about 20% of the IoT devices connected in 2020, according to our projections. Additionally, we believe that the smart home market will slow overall consumer adoption of the IoT because of the price concern that Accenture found, but other consumer IoT device categories will flourish.

The connected car, smart home, and wearables categories will make up the majority of the consumer IoT market. The connected car market is set for fast growth as automakers are connecting more and more of their models. Between 35-40% of cars shipped in the US last year were connected, and we expect about two-thirds will be connected in 2016. Typically, the car’s connection is already built into its overall cost, and consumers can often get their car added to their mobile data plan for around $10 per month.

BI Intelligence also predicts that annual wearable shipments will grow by 39 million over the next four years. Fitness trackers (the most popular category of wearables) can be bought for less than $100. To compare that to a popular smart home device, the Nest thermostat costs $250. The majority of consumers are not willing to pay $250 for Nest’s product when they can buy a non-connected thermostat for $20 or less. So we expect the smart home market to grow slowly in the near-term until device manufacturers can bring down the cost of their products to make them more affordable for consumers.

The enterprise is growing faster that consumer:IOT

HIGH PRICES MEAN THE SMART HOME MARKET WILL DRAG ON CONSUMER IoT ADOPTION: Lack of consumer demand will inhibit IoT adoption, as many consumers are turned off by the high prices of many consumer IoT products, a recent Motley Fool article predicts. The article questioned the reliability of forecasts predicting billions of IoT devices will be deployed over the next few years, citing a consumer survey by Accenture in which 62% of respondents called IoT devices too expensive. The Motley Fool article points out that enterprises will be faster than consumers to adopt IoT devices, as  the data extracted from these devices will be extremely valuable for them.

BI Intelligence agrees with the assessment that enterprises will adopt IoT devices faster than consumers. We predict that 24 billion IoT devices will be connected by 2020, with enterprise IoT devices making up the biggest share of that installed base, followed by the government and then consumer sectors. The consumer sector will make up only about 20% of the IoT devices connected in 2020, according to our projections. Additionally, we believe that the smart home market will slow overall consumer adoption of the IoT because of the price concern that Accenture found, but other consumer IoT device categories will flourish.

The connected car, smart home, and wearables categories will make up the majority of the consumer IoT market. The connected car market is set for fast growth as automakers are connecting more and more of their models. Between 35-40% of cars shipped in the US last year were connected, and we expect about two-thirds will be connected in 2016. Typically, the car’s connection is already built into its overall cost, and consumers can often get their car added to their mobile data plan for around $10 per month.

BI Intelligence also predicts that annual wearable shipments will grow by 39 million over the next four years. Fitness trackers (the most popular category of wearables) can be bought for less than $100. To compare that to a popular smart home device, the Nest thermostat costs $250. The majority of consumers are not willing to pay $250 for Nest’s product when they can buy a non-connected thermostat for $20 or less. So we expect the smart home market to grow slowly in the near-term until device manufacturers can bring down the cost of their products to make them more affordable for consumers.

Please take my Super Bowl survey. Visit http://petedeutschman.com

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1xef0bsBtbpaTVRsR7Q0ckS41TQPLU9SgqIZcteU5Otw/viewform

Been thinking a lot lately about modes of distribution, awareness and the evolution of engagement since I started The Buddy Group 10 years ago.

I am going to write a post on the topic and need your help.

Following Sunday’s game, please take 2 min to take my fun survey. I will release the results on Monday.

Much Appreciated!